kangaroos

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August 2015

Kangaroo Poems

By | August 19th, 2015|Tags: , , |

This month, our Zooworks winners got in touch with their inner poets! These were some of our favorite poems that we got about this month’s animal, kangaroos. Which one is your favorite?

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Wallaby Mob

By | August 6th, 2015|Tags: , , |

Petrogale_xanthopus_-_Monarto_1If you’re lucky enough to go to the Adelaide Zoo in Australia, you’ll want to keep an eye out for the mob. But this mob won’t have you in danger of “swimming with the fishes”– the zoo is home to a mob of thirteen yellow-footed rock-wallabies! They’ve had wallabies on display to the public since 1883, and they’re proud to continue the tradition to this day. In the wild, yellow-footed rock-wallabies live in caves and rocky outcrops, and while they do face habitat loss, their numbers are much stronger than those of their cousins, the highly endangered Victorian brush-tailed rock-wallaby. There are less than sixty brush-tailed wallabies left in the wild. The Adelaide Zoo is taking steps to help conserve these endangered animals, and the yellow-footed rock-wallabies are helping. Baby brush-tailed wallabies born at the zoo are fostered by yellow-footed wallabies, leaving the brush-tailed moms able to have another baby before the breeding season is over, increasing the numbers of this endangered species. On the zoo’s website, you can learn more about Spice, Tiga Lilly, Lizzie, Senna, and other yellow-footed rock-wallabies that are helping out with the program!

 

Photo by Wikimedia Commons contributor Peripitus

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July 2015

The World’s Smallest Kangaroos

By | July 30th, 2015|Tags: |

Musky-ratThe kangaroos that you’ve probably seen in movies and zoos are big, like gray kangaroos, which can stand over six feet tall. However, there are dozens of animals in the kangaroo family, ranging from the lanky red kangaroos of Australia’s plains to the fuzzy tree kangaroos of Australia’s… trees. The smallest member of the kangaroo family is the musky rat-kangaroo. They weigh less than a pound, and they’re only about a foot long including their long rat-like tails. Their diet consists of fruit, seeds, and bugs. They might look like a mix between rats and rabbits, but these tiny kangaroos are actually believed to be related to primitive marsupial ancestors. They live only in the rainforests of northeast Australia, which means that we have to be careful to make sure their habitats can support them for years to come.

 

Photo credit: Wikimedia  Commons contributor PanBK

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Kooky Kangaroos

By | July 8th, 2015|Tags: |

DSC_0640-2All animals have their own special quirks that set them apart and make them unique, but kangaroos have a special place in our hearts. They look like deer, but they hop like rabbits, and they carry their babies in pouches. As marsupials, they give birth to young that are far less developed than the babies of other animals—baby kangaroos are about the size of a bumblebee! The tiny babies settle into their mothers’ pouches to grow until they’re strong enough to face the world on their own. They stay in for six months, and they don’t leave their moms’ pouches for good until they’re eight to ten months old.
Their pouches aren’t the only reason kangaroos are special. They hop on their powerful back legs, and they can also swim if they’re trying to escape predators. But water’s not always around for drinking, let alone swimming. Kangaroos live in Australia’s dry plains, so they have to find ways to survive on very little water. Some species can go for weeks or even months without water. Instead, they get the fluids they need from the plants they eat.
Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

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June 2015

Forward-thinking: The Australia Zoo

By | June 24th, 2015|Tags: , |

Kangaroos are great at using their tails as a “third leg” to propel themselves forward, but they’re one of the only animals that aren’t able to easily move backwards. Their “forward-thinking” attitudes are part of what landed kangaroos a role as Australia’s national animal, but there are lots of other reasons to love them too, like their curious, friendly natures. You can get to know some of the kangaroos at the Australia Zoo on their website.
The Australia Zoo is home to several species of kangaroo, from tiny wallabies to giant red kangaroos. On their website, they have photos and profiles with fun facts about their animals. For example, Pebbles the red kangaroo likes to sneak up behind her mob-mates, pull their tails, and run away! Which of their kangaroos is your favorite?

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