October 2015

Know Your Elephants

By | October 14th, 2015|Tags: , |

African-Asian-EarsThe latest issue of Zootles focuses on one of the most popular animals: elephants. But how well do you know the different kinds of elephants (African and Asian)? This quick list will help you be an expert for your next trip to the zoo!

African elephants are a good deal bigger than their Asian counterparts. African elephants stand up to thirteen feet tall at the shoulder, while Asian elephants only reach about nine feet. African elephants weigh more, too—up to 15,400 pounds, compared to Asian elephants’ top weight of 13,200 pounds.
Both male and female African elephants have tusks, but in Asian elephants, it’s rare for the females to have tusks.
You know the crescent-shaped, toenail-like structures on elephants’ feet? It turns out that Asian elephants have more of them than African elephants. Asian elephants have five “toenails” on their front feet, and four on their back feet—African elephants have four or five toes in front, and only three in back.
African elephants are gray, but Asian elephants have a brownish-pinkish hue.
African elephants have bigger ears than Asian ones, and their ears are differently shaped—Asian elephants’ ears are rounded, while African elephants’ ears are shaped almost like the continent of Africa.


Photo by Kjrajesh

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September 2015

Elephant Smarts

By | September 10th, 2015|Tags: , |

Elephant_show_in_Chiang_Mai_P1110469With the school year starting up, we’re all focused on learning. It turns out, the Zootles animals this month are pretty smart too– elephants! Elephants have the largest brains of any land animal, but that shouldn’t be too surprising– after all, male African elephants are the biggest land animals in the world. However, their brains aren’t just big– they’re packed with three times the number of neurons, the cells that move information through the brain via chemical and electrical signals, that humans do.

Elephants have keen problem-solving skills that they use to find food, including using sticks as tools. They have deep, emotional bonds with each other and comfort each other when their friends and family are sad, sick, or hurt. And that old saying that “elephants never forget”? Elephants really do have excellent memories, remembering friends and places that they haven’t seen in years. One elephant in a zoo even learned how to paint!

Photo by Deror Avi.


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