City animals

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May 2015

Sharing the Planet with Animals

By | May 27th, 2015|Tags: |

12977357524_2aeb09c2c0_oIn City Animals, you can learn all about the different animals that we share our urban environments with. It’s interesting to think about the profound impact that humans have had upon the planet—no other species has made as many changes to the earth or affected as many other species as we have. Many animal species’ habitats and habits have changed based upon their interactions with people. For instance, squirrels used to live only in forests, but when people began farming, squirrels moved closer to them to snag some corn and grains. Now, squirrels are common in just about every city in the country.
Can you think of any other animals that are different because of their relationships with humans?

Photo by Flickr user Henry Hemming

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From the Wilds of . . . Suburbia?

By | May 6th, 2015|Tags: , |

RaccooneatingNormally when you go to a zoo, you make a beeline for the animals that you can’t see every day, like lions and bears. But many zoos also feature exhibits of animals that live more locally. These animals are often rescues that can’t live in the wild. For instance, at the Folsom City Zoo Sanctuary, you can see Crash, a raccoon who got his name after he was rescued after being hit by a car. When animals are injured, even if they’re nursed back to health, they don’t always have the ability to make it on their own—a damaged wing might make it impossible for a hawk to hunt for prey, or blindness might make a skunk more vulnerable to predators. Zoos, nature centers, and wildlife sanctuaries can provide these animals with a new lease on life. And they’re exciting for you to visit, too—even though foxes, possums, raccoons, and squirrels might live near you, you can get a much closer look at them at the zoo!

 

Photo by the Folsom City Zoo Sanctuary.

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April 2015

City Animals

By | April 29th, 2015|Tags: |

raccoon Waschbaer_auf_dem_Dach

We normally think that if you want to see some animals, you have to go out to the forest or countryside. However, there are lots of animals that thrive in our neighborhoods and cities, too! For thousands of years, animals have adapted to living near humans and taking advantage of our buildings for shelter and our garbage for food. But the raccoons, possums, squirrels, and rabbits that live in most American cities aren’t the only animals that can be found near people. Peregrine falcons make their nests on the tops of skyscrapers (in less urban areas, they live up on rocky cliffs). In Miami, you can sometimes spot alligators near the roadside, and in Churchill, Manitoba, you can see migrating polar bears.

For animals that have adapted to living near humans—like the raccoons and possums that you see going through your trash—the spread of our cities is nothing to worry about. The more humans there are, the more garbage there is to eat! For animals that live on the edges of cities, like bobcats and bears, humans spreading into their space can spell trouble. You can learn more about how we can better share our planet with our animal friends in Zoobooks and at your local zoo or nature center!

Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons contributor Carsten Volkwein.

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