February 2015

Cute Camels

By | February 19th, 2015|Tags: , |

This month, our Zooworks winners have drawn some fantastic camels! Each of these drawings shows a lot of talent and creativity—do you have a favorite?

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Camels in Alaska?

By | February 4th, 2015|Tags: , |

Camel_seitlich_trabendHappy Hump Day! To reward yourself for getting halfway through the week, take a break and check out the Alaska Zoo’s website. They’ve got all kinds of fun facts about animals, including the ones featured in the most recent Zoobooks: camels!
If you think of camels as animals that live in the hot desert, you might feel bad for the camels living up in Alaska—but don’t worry! In their natural habitats, Bactian camels survive temperatures of -40° F, so the Alaska Zoo is just fine by them. And that’s not the only thing these tough animals can withstand— Bactrian camels can drink spring water with a higher salt content than seawater, something that no other animal can do. They even withstood decades of nuclear testing in their native home, the Gobi Desert in China.
But even though wild camels are extremely tough, they’re in trouble. With only 1,000 camels left in the wild, they’re critically endangered. You can help the camels by visiting The Wild Camel Protection Foundation. Find out what you can do to ensure that these amazing animals are around for years to come!


Photo source: Wikimedia Commons


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January 2015

Crazy About Camels

By | January 28th, 2015|Tags: , |

2011_Trampeltier_1528With the January weather, you might find yourself wishing you lived someplace warm, like the hot deserts where camels make their homes. But even though camels live in deserts, that doesn’t mean that they never have to face the cold. Bactrian camels (the ones with two humps) live in mountainous regions of Asia where it gets to be 122°F in the summer, but -20° on winter nights. Camels are tough, though—in addition to thriving in extreme temperatures, they’re also famously able to go for long periods without water. When it’s hot out, they can go a week without a drink—and when it’s cooler, they can last up to six months without water. They don’t even get much moisture from their food—their diet includes dry sticks, salty plants, and thorns. (By the way, they don’t store water in their humps—those are full of fat!)
Thanks to their hardiness, camels have been valued by people all over the world for thousands of years. You’re probably familiar with domesticated camels in Asia and Africa, but there are other camels closer to home that you might not have thought about. Some humpless wild camels in South America have been domesticated, creating two animals that you might know: alpacas and llamas.


Photo source: Wikimedia Commons

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