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So far The Wild World of Zoobooks has created 231 blog entries.

February 2017

Great Gorillas!

By | February 2nd, 2017|

Check out the amazing work by this month’s Zooworks winners!

Click here to view the gallery

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January 2017

How Are Gorillas Like Humans?

By | January 18th, 2017|

Gorillas are some of our closest relatives—only the bonobo and the chimpanzee are more closely related to humans. Between 95 and 99 percent of their DNA is the same as ours, and there are lots of aspects of gorillas’ lives that are like humans’. Gorillas live in family groups called troops, and gorilla mothers take very good care of their babies.

Gorillas are extremely intelligent animals. They communicate with each other through vocalizations like grunts and barks, and some gorillas in captivity have been taught some sign language. Gorillas also use tools to find food and build their nests. Not so different from us!800px-gorillas_in_uganda-3_by_fiver_locker

Photo by Five Locker

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Gorillas at the Franklin Park Zoo

By | January 12th, 2017|

The western lowland gorilla is critically endangered, but the Franklin Park Zoo is working hard to protect these animals. By helping your kids get excited about animals like gorillas, you can help a new generation get motivated to work for conservation. The Franklin Park Zoo’s website is a great place to start—they have all kinds of crafts, quizzes, photos, and facts to encourage any young nature lover’s passion for the world around us. They even have a page dedicated to real-life ways that your family can help the fight for the animals we share our planet with, like creating butterfly gardens and compost piles. Little things like that add up to big change, including the kind of change that can help the great apes!

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Pandas and Koalas

By | January 5th, 2017|

We talk about “panda bears” and “koala bears,” but for a long time, neither was actually considered a bear species! Koalas are definitely not bears—they’re marsupials, distant cousins of kangaroos and wombats. However, their short faces and rounded ears make them look a little bear-like, hence the nickname.

Pandas are another story. Physically, they have a lot in common with bears, but there are also lots of differences. They eat almost nothing but bamboo, and they have an enlarged bone on their hands that looks like a thumb—characteristics that seem to make them more like red pandas, which are part of the raccoon family. Recent DNA studies, though, have shown that pandas are indeed part of the bear family—they’re just not as closely related to polar bears, grizzlies, and the others as they are to each other!

panda koala.png


Photos via Wikimedia Commons

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December 2016

Frozen Dinos

By | December 22nd, 2016|

The average temperature in Antarctica is around -70 degrees Fahrenheit, but that wasn’t always the case– tens of millions of years ago, it was a temperate area with lots of life– including dinosaurs. Expeditions to find their fossils are tough, because paleontologists have to brave frigid weather and find ways to remove the fossils from the frozen ground– often, they have to use rock saws to remove big sections of rock that contains the fossils and bring the whole thing back home with them. But the dinosaurs they find are amazing, like this predatory dinosaur called Cryolophosaurus. Its name means “frozen crested lizard!”

And if you’ve got a dinosaur fan in your family, be sure to check out our new Zoodinos series!


Photo via Wikimedia Commons

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Radical Rhinos

By | December 14th, 2016|

Check out the awesome rhinos this month’s Zooworks winners drew!

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Saving the Rhinos

By | December 7th, 2016|

Rhinos are at once some of the world’s most popular animals, and some of its most critically endangered. These massive animals require plenty of space, and destruction of their habitats has put them at great risk. On top of that, poachers hunt rhinos for their ivory horns, to the point that some species of rhino are on the brink of extinction.  There are only three northern white rhinos remaining in the world, and only sixty or so Javanese rhinos.

However, all hope’s not lost—environmental scientists have been working to preserve these amazing animals, and have had some success. The southern white rhinoceros nearly went extinct, but there are now over 20,000 individuals, thanks to conservation efforts to protect them from poachers and reintroduce them to areas where they once lived. To help save the rhinoceros, check out the conservation programs sponsored by your local zoo!800px-white_rhino_2008_08

Photo by Wikimedia Commons user Zigomar

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Rhino Conservation at Zoo Atlanta

By | December 1st, 2016|

Black rhinos are critically endangered, but Zoo Atlanta is working to help save them! These amazing animals are hunted for their horns (which, fun fact, are made of the same keratin as our nails and hair). Poaching, combined with habitat loss, has led rhino populations to dwindle.
However, zoos like Zoo Atlanta are fighting for endangered rhinos. On their website, you can read about their work against poaching, and you can read all about why black rhinos are special. Learning about animals is the first step to protecting them, and curiosity can inspire us to join in the fight. Check out Zoo Atlanta’s black rhino photo gallery and see for yourself why these animals are worth saving!
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November 2016

Original Orangutans!

By | November 30th, 2016|

Check out these amazing orangutan drawings by our Zooworks winners!

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Spine-tingling Spinosaurus

By | November 10th, 2016|

If your Zoodinos fans devoured the latest issue about T. rex, they might like to learn about an even bigger predatory dinosaur: Spinosaurus!

Spinosaurus was enormous- up to 59 feet long and 21 tons. Its name means “spine lizard,” for the giant spikes along its back. Those spines are extensions of its back bones, and the longest ones were well over five feet long. It was discovered in Egypt in 1912, and it’s been fascinating both scientists and the general public ever since. One of its most remarkable traits is that it was probably divided its time between the water and dry land. Scientists think that Spinosaurus was largely aquatic because it has some features in common with water-dwelling creatures today, like its short hind legs (like a duck’s), a long snout for seeking  out prey in the water (like a crocodile’s). But in the water or on the land, you probably wouldn’t want to come across a Spinosaurus when it was hungry!

P.S. If you’re not already subscribed to Zoodinos, you can sign up here!


Photo by Wikimedia Commons user Mike Bowler

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October 2016

Nocturnal Animals

By | October 19th, 2016|

Our readers must have been up all night working on these gorgeous drawings of nocturnal animals!

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For the Birds

By | October 12th, 2016|

bird feeder.jpgWinter will be here before you know it, and that means that food will be scarce for our feathered friends. If you’d like to help out the birds in your neighborhood, check with your local nature center to see what kinds of birds travel through your area and what they eat. They can also give you tips on what NOT to feed them, like bread– it doesn’t have much nutritional value for them, and they’re better off with food like seeds.

Depending on where you live, backyard birds might be tiny brown sparrows, colorful red cardinals, long-legged cranes, or wide-eyed owls. What’s the coolest bird you’ve seen in your neighborhood?

Photo by Rennett Stowe

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Backyard Birds

By | October 5th, 2016|

Cardinal.jpgIn the fall and winter, food can be scarce for lots of animals, including birds. The Nashville Zoo has tips on how you can make your yard a haven for birds in the colder months, with advice about different kinds of bird seed to put out, different kinds of feeders, and where you can place them to attract the most birds. Plus, they include a gorgeous photo gallery of the kinds of birds that you might see!

If you put up a bird feeder (or if you have one already), comment with photos of the birds you’ve seen!

Photo by USFWSmidwest

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September 2016

Nature at Night

By | September 30th, 2016|

We humans are awake during the day and sleep at night, but not all animals are on the same schedule as us. Animals of all shapes and sizes, from fireflies to possums, mice to leopards, have adapted to a life after dark.

At night, it’s harder to see, so many nocturnal animals rely on their other senses or have big eyes, like owls, to help them see in low light. But despite the drawbacks, there are lots of advantages to being nocturnal too. Some animals, like lions, hunt at night, giving them an advantage over prey that sleep at night and can’t see well in the dark. On the flip side, other animals like rodents are often more active at night in order to avoid predators that could catch them during the day. For some animals, being active at night allows them to save energy on hot days– lots of desert animals sleep during the day and wake up at night when it’s cooler. Even some desert flowers only bloom at night to avoid excessive heat and sunlight!lions_at_night

Photo by Profberger

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Zooworks Elephants

By | September 23rd, 2016|

It looks like our Zooworks winners had a whole trunkful of fun making these drawings!

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